My Virtual Assistant (VA) and Tips


After two months of research, I’ve selected TimeEtc as my law firm, and my personal, virtual assistant. I’m joining Google, Skype, Facebook and the Marriott in trusting TimeEtc to help my firm with completing “everyday” tasks including administration, organization, writing, marketing, social media, researching, selling, and so much more.

Full disclosure, I do have a business relationship with TimeEtc. But here’s the deal, the only reason I have this relationship is because I’m impressed with the quality of service and trust this company to take exceptional care of my firm’s valued clients and other essential needs.

You might find it interesting to know that the TimeEtc 10-step VA selection process was designed by Sir Richard Branson’s former Executive Assistant. It’s so tough that only a fraction of those who apply make it through (something like 1 out of every 500). If the awe-inspiring people and companies posted at the TimeEtc website trust the service, I believe you can too.

To learn more about TimeEtc or to try the service for free, I invite you to learn more or get started by clicking here!

________

Virtual Assistant Tips

Set Things Up: Take a couple of minutes and set things up. TimeEtc allows me to select a general VA for most of my tasks or, select various specialist. All my options are available in the easy to use drop-down VA selection lists.

Continue reading “My Virtual Assistant (VA) and Tips”

Three Simple Ways Katy Perry Could Have Avoided Creative Copyright Infringement

The lawsuit against Katy Perry’s copyright infringement for her smash hit, “Dark Horse”, has come to a close. The singer was found guilty for copyright infringement in August 2019, and it cost her a whopping $2.78 million.

While the defense team argued Perry used basic pop music building blocks for the song, the jury found otherwise. The lesson to be learned is that one can never be too careful.

So what steps can creatives take to avoid getting sued for copyright infringement?

Be inspired, but don’t copy.

There’s a blurred line between saying one was inspired by a creative piece, and actually “taking” a part of it for your original idea. Even if Perry had admitted to using another artist’s song as inspiration for “Dark Horse”, the verdict shows that she was inspired a bit too much. The lesson here: admire others, but stay 100% original. If you question whether it may violate copyright laws, it probably does.

If you really love something, ask permission.

So let’s say you really, really love a song (or photograph or painting, etc.) and want to use some of it in your music (or artwork, etc.), you’re better off just asking and getting written permission. Find out who the owner is and ask if you could use it or have a license to use it. It’ll be a hit or miss (and may even cost you some — or a lot — of money), but it’s better than getting sued later on.

When in doubt, look it up.

If you have any questions regarding copyright — including how much of a work you can use (and in what manner) — definitely consider talking to a lawyer or doing some research through the U.S. Copyright Office website. Their FAQ page at the Copyright Office site has tons of answers you may be searching for, too.

Old Guys and Gals Rule on Social Media!

I’m just saying! Share your wisdom and experience. Show us how you learned from your mistakes and created success.

Look, I’m a trial lawyer. Does this look like your typical lawyer video? I did everything with my phone. It’s not great but it’s different and effective right?

My advice is to NEVER stop raising the bar and when it comes to business and life. And when it comes to creating video content (pay attention lawyer friends), try modeling these guys and gals:

Casey Neistat

Philip DeFranco

Sunny Lenarduzzi

Roberto Blake

Sean Cannell

__________

Check out my new weekly show for online business owners with new episodes each week! Here’s the link OnlineBusiness.show

9 Legal, Business and Entrepreneurial Tips to Help You Start and Build Your Online Business

jon mitchell jackson 400While facts tell and emotional stories sell, incorporating these into a digital footprint and unique brand will help you build a dynasty!” -Mitch Jackson, Esq.

If you’re going to take your offline business online or, start a new business on the digital platforms, there are 9 things I think you need to know, understand and do. My recommendations are based on 33 years of practicing law, starting and running my own successful businesses, and helping clients start hundreds of new companies. Many insights are also premised around my own experiences relating to our firm’s online presence since 1996.

Before we get started, please remember that although I am a California trial attorney, and a pretty good one at that, I’m not your attorney. This is not legal advice. Also, the laws in each state are different so please contact an experienced attorney in your state to discuss questions, legal needs and options (need help finding a good lawyer? Here’s an easy and inexpensive way that I recommend to help you get legal advice and help in all 50 states)


DO BUSINESS AS A CORPORATION OR LLC

Whether you know it or not, the real question in today’s business world isn’t if you’ll be sued? It’s when will you be sued? According to recent statistics, the average small business owner will be sued at least 3 times during his or her business lifetime. Knowing this, I encourage you to please be smart, plan ahead, and take steps to protect yourself and your business before something bad happens.

Corporations and Limited Liability Companies (LLC) allow you to put a protective shield between your business liabilities and personal assets. If you correctly set up, run and manage your company (and that’s a big if), your personal assets will be protected if a claim or lawsuit is ever brought against your business.

Most people don’t set up their corporations and LLCs correctly. Those who do often times drop the ball down the line when it comes to managing the entity. Their are numerous filing, registration, legal, tax and insurance requirements that all must be setup and managed correctly over the long-term. The point of this article is to make you aware of the business entity options and that these requirements exist. An experienced professional in your city and state can hold your hand and make sure you do everything correctly.

One more thing. In my opinion you should never do business as a sole proprietor (an individual) or general partnership. For the above reasons (and many more), there’s just too much liability attached to doing so. Doing business as a sole proprietor is by far the biggest mistake I see people make when doing business online. Instead, form a corporation or LLC and do business as a legal business entity. Continue reading “9 Legal, Business and Entrepreneurial Tips to Help You Start and Build Your Online Business”

Thank You!

A big THANK YOU to everyone for your help with the book and for your recommendations on social media and Amazon. It’s all very much appreciated!

If anyone is interested, you can see more pics and videos here