Get FREE Answers To Your Coronavirus Legal Questions

For the next couple of weeks, I’ll be answering your Coronavirus legal/biz questions for free. I shared this video on Twitter earlier today and it explains the details.

Have a question. Ask it here! 

#covid19

8 TIPS FOR WORKING FROM HOME

I hope you find these 8 tips helpful (Twitter thread)

CORONAVIRUS, CONFERENCES, AND LIABILITY- Tips for Speakers, Event Holders, and Attendees

If you’re an individual or company that owns, manages, or controls a conference or event, you owe everyone involved, a legal duty of due care not to subject attendees, speakers, and those working at the event, to an unreasonable risk of harm. What this means is that you have an obligation to provide a safe conference environment and, to warn people of known or reasonably discoverable dangerous conditions.

I did a quick search in CaseText (AI based legal research service) and instantly found thousands of cases where conferences and events have been held liable for subjecting people to an unreasonable risks of harm. Full transparency, I’m a brand ambassador for CaseText because it’s awesome!

Just like the cases I found where conferences were held liable for exposing their attendees to dangerous conditions, I think the same argument applies to those conferences that create an environment that exposes people to unhealthy situations, including harm or death from the Coronavirus (COVID-19).

And I’m not alone. For both legal, ethical and health safety reasons, thousands of small and large conferences around the world have been delayed or canceled because of the Coronavirus.

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s rescheduling of his Sports and Fitness Festival is a good example of what’s happening right now. Watch the video.

On Friday, the City of Austin cancelled the March SXSW event. Here’s a list from Thursday’s USA Today, sharing other canceled or rescheduled events.

Continue reading “CORONAVIRUS, CONFERENCES, AND LIABILITY- Tips for Speakers, Event Holders, and Attendees”

California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) takes effect on January 1, 2020. This new law creates greater privacy rights for California consumers including:

  • The right to know what personal information is collected, used, shared or sold;
  • The right to delete, or have deleted, personal information held by businesses;
  • The right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information;
  • The right to non-discrimination in terms of price or service when a consumer exercises a privacy right under CCPA.
What Businesses are Subject to the CCPA?

Businesses that fall under the CCPA include any business that meets one or more of the following conditions:

  • Has gross annual revenues in excess of $25 million;
  • Buys, receives, or sells the personal information of 50,000 or more consumers, households, or devices;
  • Derives 50 percent or more of annual revenues from selling consumers’ personal information.

If your business is subject to CCPA requirements, certain steps must be taken when collecting and handling consumer data. You can get the latest information and email updates at the CCPA website and in this two page summary.

Think the CCPA is bad or good? Will it affect your business? Reach out in the comments below or by private message.